Lone Star Politics

Theories, Concepts, and Political Activity in Texas (First Edition)
Written and edited by Darrell Lovell
Paperback, 334 pages
ISBN: 978-1-5165-2477-8 ©2018
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Lone Star Politics
Lone Star Politics

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$87.95

Summary
    Lone Star Politics: Theories, Concepts, and Political Activity in Texas blends the history of political activity in the state with theories that underlie and explain this activity. Through both classic and contemporary political literature students learn about the unique political culture that exists in Texas, and how governments at various levels function within it.

    Over the course of thirteen chapters, students explore topics such as the evolution and impact of the Texas Constitution, the Texas view of federalism, the role of local governments in the state, and the role of the executive branch. They study the legislature and judiciary, and see how conservative ideology influences both public and social policy. They become familiar with the state's economy, its political parties, and their roles in the evolution of the state. The book concludes with an examination of interest groups in the state and the parts they play in the political system.

    Featuring on-point reading excerpts from diverse sources, Lone Star Politics is ideal for classes on Texas government that focus on the concepts and theories driving the state’s political activity.

    Darrell Lovell holds a master's degree in public administration from the University of Colorado, Denver and has also pursued extensive graduate work in political science at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. A faculty member at Lone Star College University Park, his areas of interest include public policy in the areas of housing, education, and immigration and Mexican-American political activity. Professor Lovell has made numerous conference presentations on topics that promote political assimilation of the Mexican-American community and recent effects of interest groups on the Mexican-American vote.