Catalog
Browse All Titles
Need help finding a course text?
Call 800.200.3908 x503 or email us for assistance.
Are you a student?
Purchase course texts and access e-books in our Student Store.
Have you purchased an e-book?
Login here to view.
 
Psychology: A Hands-On Guide and WorkbookSusan Whitbourne
(?)

Psychology

A Hands-On Guide and Workbook (First Edition)
By Susan Krauss Whitbourne

Binder Ready ISBN: 978-1-63189-328-5, 304 pages

©2016

Description
Psychology: A Hands-On Guide and Workbook combines readings and active-learning experiences. It engages students and makes the material personally relevant through the application of psychology to their daily lives.

The book covers the traditional topics included in introductory psychology courses such as the nervous system, the five senses, consciousness, conditioning, and memory. The topics are presented in a way that engages the students and allows them to test their knowledge through interactive exercises.

Each chapter opens with key questions that help students focus their learning. The book includes easily understood charts and tables to support the information. All chapters feature a “takeaways” section, which allows students to paraphrase key concepts to support their retention, and designated study tips that help students retain the material.

Psychology: A Hands-On Guide and Workbook is an easy-to-use study guide and outline for organizing the material in introductory psychology courses. It can be used as a supplement to standard texts or as a stand-alone textbook for professors who want a condensed version of the material.

Biography
Susan Krauss Whitbourne is a professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research focuses on personality and cognitive processes throughout adulthood. Her current projects include a study of personality from college through retirement and the use of video games in cognitive training for older adults. She is the author of “Fulfillment at Any Age,” a popular blog on Psychology Today.