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MacroeconomicsBrian A. Hunt
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Macroeconomics

Principles Deconstructed (First Edition)
By Brian A. Hunt

Paperback ISBN: 978-1-5165-1433-5, 200 pages

©2017

Description
Macroeconomics: Principles Deconstructed offers students a compelling, adventurous treatment of standard macroeconomic principles. The book takes an incentive-based, open-economy approach to Keynesian economics and challenges students to rethink policy approaches in order to tackle contemporary domestic and global economic challenges.

While students will explore familiar macroeconomic topics such as supply and demand, fiscal and monetary policy, savings and investment, and economic growth, Macroeconomics challenges the traditional top-down view of macroeconomics and instead takes a bottom-up view which emphasizes the importance of microeconomic forces in shaping macroeconomic performance and policies. The text demonstrates the macroeconomy as a product of the behavior and performance of a multitude of interconnected microeconomic markets influencing national and global economic events.

Macroeconomics helps students see the integral role they play in the global economy and how their choices at home shape macroeconomic outcomes around the world. The text is well-suited to courses in macroeconomics that want to examine and critique applied Keynesian economics principles in a post-2007-2009 financial crisis environment.

Biography
Brian A. Hunt earned his M.A. in global trade, finance, and economic integration at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies. He has worked in international banking with U.S. Bank and Bank One and served as an open-source intelligence analyst covering economic, political, and security issues in East and Southeast Asia for Global 1000 companies. Currently, he serves as an economist and visiting lecturer in the Department of Economics at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies in Atlanta.